Self Evaluation Summary 2015-16

 

 

November 2015

 

 

Overall Effectiveness:1 Outstanding

Evidence:

The school is “outstanding” in all areas. Ofsted July 2015All groups make excellent progress overall, including those with disabilities and those with SEN.The school is a very harmonious community where relationships are excellent. Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is outstanding.

Areas for improvement:
To further develop the attainment in writing

 

Effectiveness of leadership and management:1

Evidence:
Improvements are sustained through establishing a culture of both support and accountability. Colleagues throughout the school work in partnership, accepting advice and supporting each other, and are completely open about how we need to improve.Professional development is tightly focused on both individual need (identified through discussion and the school’s evaluation cycle) and on school development priorities.School development priority planning is consistent at all levels, with targets established not just through rigorous data monitoring and the school’s evaluation cycle, but also through discussion with key stakeholders, particularly children. The subject co-ordinators’ action plans extend the key priorities of the school. Middle managers hold responsibility for implementing them and expect to be held accountable. Middle managers are well informed and have great impact in ensuring sustained improvement.Senior managers and the head teacher are held accountable by a well-structured and experienced governing body who ask searching questions (see minutes). They have a wide range of expertise and are highly confident in using RAISEonline and analysing other data to check on the school’s performance. Financial management is strong, with a particular focus on ensuring the pupil premium is used effectively. Governors are rigorous in ensuring statutory requirements: they monitor policies and see that the school meets equalities legislation and ensure child protection is tight and that health and safety legislation is well implemented (see minutes and risk assessment, plus training records). Governors also play a significant part in monitoring the performance management of teachers, ensuring that senior leaders are rigorous in applying the Teachers’ Standards.Parents and carers feel welcome at the school; 99% of parents who returned the Ofsted questionnaire said that they would recommend the school to another parent, 99% of parents said that they felt that their child makes good progress at the school. Subject leaders ensure that subject requirements are fully covered; year teams are also encouraged to innovate and provide memorable experiences. The school’s size enables it to provide a wide range of extra-curricular activities and participation is monitored by gender, ethnicity and vulnerable groups.
Areas for development:
• To explore ways of developing outreach work to help support other schools

 

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment:1 Outstanding

Evidence:

Lesson observations show that by the end of 2014/15 all teaching was graded as at least “good” and most was outstanding. Particularly outstanding features have been the use of stimulating and exciting activities and resources, together with excellent behaviour for learning. Monitoring also identifies that the pitch of the objectives shows high expectations, which are rooted in the curriculum planning carried out jointly by teachers in the same year groups. The majority of teachers are adept at monitoring pupils’ progress during lessons, feeding back to them and adjusting activities where needed. The School’s evaluation cycle also records lots of good examples of teaching assistants (TA’s) and learning support assistants (LSA’s) intervening to make sure progress remains rapid. TAs also make an excellent contribution to the phonics programme. TA’s have been trained in teaching phonics, including having a particular focus on the needs of pupils with SEN and multisensory approaches, which have been very effective in reception and year 1 and year 2. When marking work, comments are included on whether objectives have been met and how to improve. Children respond to comments through the use of the green “reflection pen”. Our evaluation cycle identifies a high level of consistency in the use of lesson objectives in marking. Discussions with pupils show they know how to improve, and they can see the link between the lesson objectives they achieve and their own targets. When teachers plan topics together, they draw on each other’s subject expertise. There is a good mix including science, music and art specialists. They visit year group teams and share some excellent ideas about use of resources and approaches to make learning interesting. Discussions with pupils show they have been highly successful.The use of structured discussion (peer and group), and strategies such as ‘hot seating’ have had a strong impact on our successful work in writing. All pupils, including those with EAL, have benefited from the close focus on talk. Parents receive regular and frequent updates on their children’s progress, together with guidance on what needs to be improved to do even better.

Areas for development:
• To establish and develop the new assessment system

 

Personal development, behaviour and welfare: 1 Outstanding

Evidence:

Pupils say they enjoy lessons, with 97% thinking behaviour is good. Pupils think teachers are fair and very clear about the classroom routines and procedures. Observations identify very good behaviour for learning in all classrooms. Pupils listen to their peers and praise their contributions. They are well versed in self-assessment and peer-assessment and are very keen to improve their work. Routines are very well established in nursery and reception and expectations are consistent throughout the school. Children are independent learners who assess resources and have strategies for supporting their learning. Some pupils with particular behaviour and learning needs can demonstrate striking improvement, not only through the support from teachers and TAs, but also through support from classmates. Throughout the school, from the earliest age, pupils are very proud of their work and of being part of the school. They develop a real love for learning and a great enthusiasm for improving their work and finding things out for themselves. There have been no permanent exclusions. We have had temporary exclusions for some pupils. A clear process of analysis is carried out after these incidents to ensure that the school learns from the incidents and puts in place any preventative measures where possible.Behaviour at lunchtime is outstanding; children have a range of equipment available to them. There are very few bullying incidents for a school this size. Parent questionnaires show that 100% of parents agree or strongly agree that their children feel safe at school.  The Junior Leadership Team and Infant Leadership Teams take an active role in promoting activities in the school. Safety awareness is included in curriculum work, e.g. internet safety and the prevention of cyberbullying. Pupils are punctual and the breakfast club is very well attended. Absence is running at about 3%. A few families still take children on unauthorised extended holidays.

Areas for development:
• To continue to improve attendance to 98%

 

Outcomes for children and learners: 1 Outstanding

Evidence:

There are no weaknesses identified in the Inspection Dashboard.The proportion of Year 1 pupils that met the expected standard in phonics was above the national averageDisadvantaged pupils is KS1 had an average point score that was equal to or above the national score for other pupils in reading and mathematicsThe proportion of disadvantaged KS1 pupils that attained at least level 2B was equal or above the national figure in writingDisadvantaged pupils is KS2 had an average point score that was equal to or above the national score for other pupils in reading and mathematicsThe proportion of disadvantaged pupils that attained at least a level 4 was equal to or above the national figure for other pupils in reading and mathematicsThe proportion of disadvantaged pupils that attained at least a level 5 was equal to or above the national figure for other pupils in reading and mathematicsThroughout KS2 children make more progress than the national averageThe 2015 data shows that the proportion of children achieving the level 3 standard in year 2 and the level 5 standard in has risen considerably.

Areas for development:
• Ensure that the small attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their classmates is eradicated in writing

 

The effectiveness of early years provision: 1

Evidence:
“Early years provision is outstanding. The children make outstanding progress with their learning, and are prepared extremely well for Year 1.” (Ofsted 2015)In 2014 a higher than average proportion of children achieved a good level of development.Teaching in the early years is outstanding and leads to outstanding levels of progress for children in all areas of learning.Children are provided with a highly stimulating environment in which to learn, with a wide range of interesting and engaging activities, both indoor and outdoor. Adults check children’s progress closely and make sure that they plan activities that help the children make rapid progress.
Areas for development:
• For 8% of pupils to achieve the “exceeding” level in their writing

 

Overall Effectiveness:1

Evidence:

The school is “outstanding” in all areas. Ofsted July 2015All groups make excellent progress overall, including those with disabilities and those with SEN.The school is a very harmonious community where relationships are excellent. Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is outstanding.

Areas for improvement:
To further develop the attainment in writing